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Three Questions to Ask Your VPS Provider about Data Security

Online Data Security Computer with Lock
Image by TheDigitalWay from Pixabay

Data security is one of the top concerns of businesses and website owners. Even though you can create the toughest passwords for users, good data security runs deeper. If you are considering a virtual private server (VPS) for hosting your website or blog, you need to know what measures are in place to protect your data. Here are three questions about data security you need to ask your VPS provider.

What Software Is Involved with Data Security?

Before diving into specifics on data security, your provider should be able to explain how your data is stored.  A VPS is run using hypervisor software, which manages the data and memory.  The hypervisors ensure that specific processes and data are kept separate between different VPS. All the control processes are run from this software, too. The hypervisors should have numerous security features built in, such as a firewall. Firewalls are designed to prevent unauthorized access to a private network. Be sure to ask your provider to explain all the security measures available with purchasing a VPS.

What Makes My Data Vulnerable?

Another great question to ask your VPS provider is, “what will make my data susceptible to a security breach?” A quality provider will be able to give you tips on how best to keep your data secure on your end of things. For example, one of the easiest ways to avoid security issues is to only run the software that you need. Make sure that you do not have extra, unused software taking up precious memory on the server. The more software you have, the more opportunities for a breach. Another great tip is to make sure you have strong passwords for any user accounts accessing the website or server operations.

Can I Upgrade for Extra Data Security?

If you are concerned about data security, ask your provider about upgrading certain server features. Different providers may or may not be able to customize your VPS to have increased security measures. However, at the very least, your provider should be able to provide a lot of information and tips on how users can increase the security of the website or server on their own. If you find that your provider cannot provide useful information, it might be time to find a new place to host your website data.

Here at Solar VPS, we take data security seriously. Our team is expert in the latest cyber security needs for servers. We have many options available to help you customize your cloud VPS hosting experience.  Visit our website to learn more about our services today.

3 Ways Virtual Private Servers Improve Data Security

data security

Photo by Pixaline on pixabay

If you’re thinking about using a virtual private server, data security needs to be front of mind. There are so many advantages to private servers. Remote access, the ability to leverage technology resources, and cost savings are just a few. However, shifting your data into a virtual private server can be catastrophic if you don’t have proper security in place. A security breach can trigger a loss in proprietary data, intellectual property, or customer information. It can cause significant reputation damage that affects your relationships with partners. Data security should be a key component of any VPS services you use. Different companies have varying security practices, so you should spend some time researching what you need. Here are three ways virtual private servers improve data security.

VPS Has the Option for Dedicated Management and Support

If you are a small company or organization, you often have to troubleshoot technical issues yourself. That means reading online how to fix something or calling in an expert. With a VPS, data security is all managed by the provider. They respond to emergencies and monitor your systems to make sure your data is secure. You don’t have to call in someone from the outside for help. Everyone working on your server has intimate knowledge of the system and the software running on it. They’ll be able to get you back online and limit the damage from any exposure.

Leverage Data Security Technology

Hiring an IT expert is expensive. It’s something you want to avoid as long as possible so you can focus more resources on building your brand or organization. With a VPS, data security is handled by the provider. It’s a great way to leverage resources and limit how much money you have to spend. They’re ultimately more familiar with IT threats that could impact your organization, so it’s the perfect way to keep you safe.

The VPS Is Offsite

If someone or some group is targeting your organization, using a VPS for hosting is much more secure. If your data is stored in a local server, bad actors can physically get to it. That kind of poor data security can be very costly. Using a VPS service means people don’t know where your data is or how to get to it. SolarVPS provides best in class VPS services to companies and other organizations looking for better technology, data security, and software solutions. If you’re interested in what a VPS can do for you, contact us today.

Moving to the Cloud: Security Tips and Concerns

Data Security in the Cloud is Vital

Of all the questions and concerns we hear on a daily basis from potential and existing customers, none eclipses Cloud security concerns. None. For companies and private consumers looking to make the jump to Cloud solutions, the largest concern which always comes across is the security of Cloud stored data and if a third party Cloud vendor can properly secure said data. But before we even get started, the one thing we have to mention is the threat of hacking. Yes, hacking happens. Yes, your Cloud provider can be hacked and yes, your servers will never be fully 100% safe from external intrusions. That being said, below is a quick guide to what you, the client, should look for in a Cloud provider when it comes to data security concerns.

Know Yourself

Before you can even consider looking into a viable Cloud hosting solution, you need to first look internally at the type of data your company deals Continue