Solar VPS Blog

Was the Cloud Designed to be This Way?

Cloud Confusion

There is a question we need to ask. It is a question which might end up annoying some people in the Cloud industry however it is one which we need to ask. Was the Cloud designed to be this way? This is to say, was the Cloud designed as terminology meant to distract everyday consumers from what really goes on in the world of data centers? Was the Cloud designed as a distraction?

Cloud Education

For the past two years, we have dedicated this space to one thing above the rest: explaining, highlighting and educating consumers on how the Cloud works and more importantly, how Cloud solutions can work for you. We have done this because here at Solar VPS, we firmly believe the more you know about how the Cloud works and how Cloud services can positively impact your business, the more prone you will be to investing in said Cloud services. And yet, on another level, we have dedicated this space to explaining Cloud and IT concepts because we know, just as other providers know, the more the public understands about the Cloud, the more the public will demand better IT solutions from providers. The more you know, the more you push for higher level services.

This stated, we have something to admit. For all the effort we have put into educating our readers and consumers concerning Cloud services, we have the feeling that we have failed. For all the information we have presented and created, we have the feeling that the marketing effort behind the Cloud was never meant to be educational. We have the feeling, the marketing behind the Cloud, for the most part, has been designed to mislead the consumer. Much like the first rule of magic, the marketing behind the Cloud has been nothing more than a purposeful distraction designed to make the viewer look one way to mask the truth. All said, the marketing behind the Cloud has been everything but simple.

Is the Cloud Battle Over?

The Battle for Cloud Computing

Published on January 15, 2014 in InformationWeek, Reuven Cohen hits on this very subject.


“There’s been a renewed debate recently over the various layers of Cloud Computing stacks. At stake is a fight for Cloud Computing market share and mind share — and possibly, the future of Cloud platforms.”
“Beyond a small group of technologists, Cloud Computing remains largely a mystery for most people. Ironically, I believe that’s the point of the Cloud: To act as an abstraction of the complexity found in more traditional data centers and application hosting infrastructures.”

That sentiment bears repeating: “Beyond a small group of technologists, Cloud Computing remains largely a mystery for most people. Ironically, I believe that’s the point of the Cloud: To act as an abstraction of the complexity found in more traditional data centers and application hosting infrastructures.” To act as an abstraction of the complexity found in more traditional data centers and application hosting infrastructures. Another way of saying this: the Cloud is meant to distract the public from an IT world which:


  1. They know nothing about

  2. Have no interest in knowing anything about

For most IT consumers and businesses, the Cloud acts as a general term meaning everything and nothing. All the polling suggests that the public has no idea what the Cloud is beyond a buzzword which now floats about the marketplace. For the public, due to the efforts of grid computing solutions, the term Cloud has stuck yet it means nothing. Cloud is amorphous. Everything and nothing. The term provides talking points without ever having to explain anything. The term provides for cost of service without ever having to explain how those revenues actual work.

On it’s head, this point seems obvious. While Solar VPS might charge $5 per month for a Cloud Linux Server with .5GB RAM, 20GB Disk, 1 CPU Cores and 2TB Bandwidth running Fedora or CentOS, another provider might charge $15 per month. You might call this an issue to take up with the free market and yet, you could also make the case the price is not set by the free market but by the provider who is looking to make the most profit from a resource bank which he/she knows could be sold at a cheaper rate to the consumer. However you want to view it, the issue comes down to the confusion created by the term Cloud. People know what it is yet they have no idea what it means.

This isn’t good and it needs to change.

Loading Facebook Comments ...

One thought on “Was the Cloud Designed to be This Way?

  1. “The Cloud” is data storage. Actual hardware. Really big servers. Owned by someone with a business who wants to share his hardware with me – for a fee – to store my data so I don’t have to invest in hardware and IT beyond an access program (that fee again) and a phone number to call if I have a problem. If I had enough servers I could charge people for cloud storage too. (Okay with a little extra software!) I can use free cloud storage. But if I need more I can pay for extra storage from Dropbox or syncplicity or Cubby (or others) depending on what my business needs. Okay that’s really simplified (there’s software access and encryption and security considerations) but maybe that’s what you’re talking about. It really is simple.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *